An unforgettable travel experience is one way of explaining an African Safari in Tanzania. It touches something deep within your soul t your root and will never be forgotten. A trip to Tanzania is both intriguing and exciting, created by the fascinating balance between the wildlife, the landscapes and its people.


Tanzanian safaris can take many forms, depending on your interests and preferences. We specialize in providing you with the finest safari experiences, in absolute comfort and style, whatever your requirements delivered in a professional package. A huge element in the success of any particular safari is the guiding. All of our safaris are expertly guided and we guarantee that even the most knowledgeable and experienced guest will learn a thing or two along the way! Days are spent observing the magnificent African wilderness and wildlife at first hand, an experience which most safari-tourists find profoundly moving and life-enhancing.

Safaris most commonly are with safari vehicles (customized with pop up viewing roof and over-sized windows) but also possible are walking safaris (allowed in select areas accompanied by armed park ranger, boat safaris and hot air balloon safaris). Also possible are fly in safaris to make the most of your time in Tanzania. Talk to us if you want to incorporate any of these options into your itinerary.

Lake Manyara National Park

This relatively small park is divided into five distinct vegetation zones: ground-water forest, marshland and reed beds, open grasslands and acacia woodland. In a single day, a visitor may see elephant, buffalo, zebra, hippo and the curious lions which have a habit of resting in trees. Sheltering under the massive escarpment of the Great Rift Valley, and covering an area of 325 sq. km, this park is a flash of green amid an otherwise parched landscape. A line of springs support the lush vegetation of a groundwater forest, where blue monkeys, baboons and the curious-looking silvery-cheeked hornbill live, among the more than 350 bird species, the most profuse being the flamingo.

Ngorongoro Crater

Eight million years ago, the Ngorongoro Crater was an active volcano but its cone collapsed, forming the crater that is 610 meters deep, 20 kilometers in diameter, and covers an area of 311 sq. km. Spectacular as it is, the crater accounts for just a tenth of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. The crater is home to many species of wild game and birds. With the exception of impala and topi and the giraffe, almost every species of African plains mammal lives in the crater, including the endangered black rhino, and the densest population of predators in Africa. A strange thing is that the crater elephants are mainly bulls. The bird-life, which includes the flamingo, is mainly seasonal, and is also affected by the ratio of soda to fresh water in Lake Magadi on the crater floor. On the crater floor, grassland blends into swamps, lakes, rivers, woodland and mountains. Only 4WD vehicles are allowed into the crater. Overnights are not permitted inside of the crater but a wide variety of accommodation types are available near the crater rim where the views are spectacular.

Tarangire National Park

The park’s permanent water supply ensures a huge and varied animal population, especially during the dry season when it rivals that of the Serengeti. The animals include large herds of elephants, rhino, buffalo, zebra, lesser and greater kudu, eland, wildebeest, hartebeest, gerenuk, impala and fringe-eared oryx. This attractive park, with its statuesque baobab trees, is the main refuge for wildlife from the surrounding part of the Great Rift Valley during the dry season. It is also an excellent place for bird-watching. The best bird-watching months are October to May.

Serengeti National Park

Covering an area of 14,763 square kilometers, equal in size to Northern Ireland, the world famous Serengeti National Park is Tanzania’s oldest park, and one of the world’s last great wildlife refuges. It is contiguous with Kenya’s Masai Mara Game Reserve and stretches as far as Lake Victoria to the West. Its name comes from the Masai word Siringet, meaning ‘endless plains’. The Serengeti ecosystem supports the greatest remaining concentration of plains game in Africa, including more than three million large mammals. It is the sanctuary of an estimated four million different animals and birds. The animals roam the park freely and in the spectacular migrations, huge herds of wild animals move to other areas of the park in search of greener grazing grounds (requiring over 4,000 tons of grass each day) and water.